Rory Staunton was born 19 years ago, on May 13th, 1999.

Rory Staunton Foundation, Orlaith Staunton, Ciaran Staunton, Rory Staunton, Kathleen Staunton, Brooklyn Bridge, Sepsis, Sepsis Kills, infections, born

Rory Staunton was born 19 years ago today, May 13th, 1999. He came into this world and we adored him from the moment we set eyes on him. His lovely sister Kathleen who is a spark of light, humor, and love, joined him two years later-it is pure joy to call them my children on Mother’s Day.

I’m a mom because of these two special children. Rory is in Heaven, and there is a profound sadness for all of us because of that. I try not to think of him there, so far away from my hugs. Rory had big dreams. He wanted to fly, and I hope he is flying high, watching over us, witnessing our love for him from afar, he is in our hearts forever.

So, Happy Birthday Rory, it shouldn’t be this way.

The Importance Of Nurses In Our Lives:
National Nurses Week 2018

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We can never over value the importance of nurses in our society. I remember the awful loneliness and fear I felt when I was beside Rory’s bed in the Intensive Care Unit and I think about those nurses, our angels, as we thought, providing medical care and comfort to Rory and us. We see how important the nursing profession is every time we visit hospitals and other healthcare settings, where nurses provide us with a wide variety of special services.

But, have you thought about school nurses and the central role they play in our lives?

School nurses are often the people advising parents to seek medical care based on the symptoms the child has. Last year at the Rory Staunton Foundation National Forum in Washington D.C. Melinda McCartin, a School Health Nursing Administrator spoke about their central role in the community.” School nurses are frontline responders and leaders that have an impactful role in promoting and modeling best infection control practices in the school community,” she said. When you think about it a good school nurse provides a central role in educating us about influenza and other illnesses, and they can tell us about the warning signs of many illnesses.

With this in mind it is really important that school nurses know the signs of sepsis and talk to parents and students about how important it is to watch for the signs. Time is crucial in sepsis cases and with more than 80% of sepsis cases originating in the community, nurses can and do save lives.

How To Clean A Wound

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We are committed at the Foundation to returning to the basics of healthcare.

It seems like somewhere along the way basic actions that can help us stay healthy and strong have been brushed aside. We know that if our son’s wound had been cleaned when he fell and the gym teacher had placed a Band-Aid on the wound Rory would be alive today. Instead tragically, Rory’s wound was not cleaned and it became infected, even worse the teacher placed a bandage on a dirty wound. So please remember the following:

Remember the Three C’s!

If you get a cut, clean it then cover it

These simple steps can protect you from dirt and germs that cause infection

How to clean a cut:

  1. Clean your hands using soap and water then put on disposable gloves if possible. Try to do this before you touch someone else’s injury.
  2. Apply gentle pressure if the wound is bleeding (don’t do this on burns). Use a clean cloth to gently press on the wound until bleeding stops. If blood is oozing from a wound seek medical attention. Also, be careful if the wound has been caused by a dirty object or rust or indeed if the wound was caused by an animal.
  3. Rinse the wound with water. Loosen and remove dirt and use a soft washcloth and mild soap to clean around the wound.
  4. Cover open wounds with a waterproof bandage to avoid infection.

Stay Healthy and Strong!

 

Thank You, Caroline!

Caroline, School Superintendent Nicholas Diaz, Sepsis, New Jersey, Sepsis Safe, Ouch I got a cut, Rory Staunton Foundation, Girl Scout Cadet.

We received an inspirational letter from Caroline, a seventh-grade student in New Jersey who is promoting sepsis awareness through her school district. Her letter is below along with a picture of her School Superintendent, Nicholas Diaz.
Thank you Caroline!

 

Hi,

My name is Caroline. I am a seventh grade Honor Roll student and Girl Scout Cadette, who loves my family and enjoys playing many sports.

I became aware of the danger of sepsis from an article I recently read in PEOPLE.com about Rory’s story. After reading the article, I was shocked and sad to learn that someone could get so sick from a cut and that so few people are aware of the signs of Sepsis.

Since there are no laws in New Jersey about reviewing the proper procedure on how to clean cuts with students, I am proactively helping my community for my Girl Scout Silver Award by raising Sepsis awareness. For my award, I will be asking my school district PTA to fund my purchase of the book, Ouch! I got a cut! for all the elementary school classrooms in my district. The goal is for the book to be read to the classes in September during Sepsis awareness month. In addition, I will be making an educational video for the students to emphasize the importance of proper care when they get a cut and introduce them the book. Looking ahead, my goal is to have the book included as required reading for each classroom in my district.

I presented this proposal to the superintendent of my district on January 2, 2018. He was very enthusiastic and invited me to present my proposal for my silver award to the PTA and to the School Board before June of this year. I couldn’t be more excited to do my part to promote Sepsis awareness and to help save lives every day.

Caroline

Six Years Dead Today

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I checked tonight it’s 2,190 days since I last saw my lovely Rory, six years, a lifetime. If anyone thinks that losing a child gets easier with time, I’m here to tell you that no, it doesn’t get easier, it’s a life sentence. I still lie awake at night, I still think about what happened all the time and I still love my young boy as if it were yesterday. No time, no months, no days, no hours will every change that.

I want Rory’s name to live on forever because he deserves that. His life story should not end because he and us, his loving family were let down by a lot of people and institutions we trusted; his school, his pediatrician and the hospital that we brought him to, that sent him home when he was very ill. Rory’s love and his spirit keep us going and will continue to keep us going forever.

Noone should die from sepsis because it’s preventable. Yes, infections happen all the time, but people don’t have to die from an infection, particularly a healthy 12-year-old boy like Rory. I am an angry mom because noone diagnosed sepsis in my child despite our pleas, they ignored our concerns and I am angry for every child and every loved one that dies from sepsis because it doesn’t have to be that way.

So, social media is very important to me. It makes a difference that people read about Rory and sepsis because awareness saves lives. I can’t bring Rory back but I can save others from going through our hell. If you know Rory’s story, or Emily Aiello’s story, or Clover Harrold’s story and so many other loved one’s stories that have died or suffered from sepsis then we can save lives because people will have the knowledge they need to ask questions.

I want to thank all our family and friends and everyone for their support throughout these awful years. Without your support, we would not be here. We will keep on fighting, although at times it is so very hard. But, It is harder to think of Rory’s death and to think that his death might be the end of his life story.

Rory’s love will keep us strong and his love will make a difference in this world. I wish others in power had spoken out before he died and I will never forgive those who could have made changes and didn’t. I am not going to lie, life and people have disappointed us, but we are fighters and together we can make a difference; we can all keep fighting for change, for more awareness and fewer deaths from sepsis.

72% of Irish Population Do Not Have An Accurate Understanding of Sepsis

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Sepsis is responsible for 3,000 deaths each year in Ireland. 60% of hospital deaths are related to sepsis, which kills more people in Ireland than heart attack, breast cancer, and lung cancer. Concern over the sepsis death toll in Ireland led the Rory Staunton Foundation and the Royal College of Surgeons Ireland to commission a study aimed at better understanding the Irish public’s understanding of sepsis. The results of the survey are startling: Just 28% of survey respondents have an accurate understanding of sepsis, which places sepsis awareness in Ireland well below awareness in the United States and the United Kingdom.

Ciaran and Orlaith Staunton have been actively involved in sepsis advocacy in their native Ireland since Rory’s death in 2012. Last month, Ciaran Staunton addressed the Royal College of Surgeons at their public lecture on sepsis. He has previously addressed healthcare professionals at Cork, Limerick, and Dublin.

What To Look Out For During Flu Season

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What to look for as a growing number of people lose their lives during flu season. Many of the people in these tragic cases made their way to hospitals and were told that they had flu when in fact they were already in septic shock. If you are septic you need an antibiotic to survive; this is good antibiotic stewardship practice. The doctor in this news piece gives advice on sepsis warning signs and the flu.

Read the original article here.

Christmas Season 2017

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It took courage to wake up and open my eyes on Christmas morning. It was Christmas Day and five years since we have celebrated Christmas with Rory. It doesn’t get any easier for us, his family, and we know we share this loss with so many other families who have buried loved ones.

The holiday season is difficult, and along the way, during the last five years, we have learned to wrap the joy we experience at this time of year with the intense sorrow that the season brings.

So – hug your little ones even closer during these precious holidays. Make sure to make memories that can be treasured forever. We have special little moments that we hold dear from times past, they are our treasures. These moments are the true meaning of life.

All I want Is… Sepsis Education For Every Child

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From the very beginning, the Rory Staunton Foundation has been committed to educating young people about sepsis. Understanding sepsis and its signs often means the difference between life and death. People who know the signs of sepsis know to seek immediate medical attention. They know that they must advocate for themselves or their loved one to get the rapid treatment so critical to survival. Sepsis education is the key to reducing the catastrophic sepsis death toll.

2017 was a very big year for the Foundation’s mission to advance sepsis education. Together with the New York State Departments of Health and Education and the American Federation of Teachers (AFT), we developed a comprehensive K-12 sepsis curriculum. The lesson plans and accompanying resources progressively educate students about how to care for minor wounds using a ‘back to basics’ approach, how infections spread, and the signs and science of sepsis. Older students even have the opportunity to create sepsis awareness campaigns to educate their communities.

On October 24, Governor Andrew Cuomo signed ‘Rory Staunton’s Law’ bringing our sepsis education curriculum to the 3 million children enrolled in New York City Schools. We are delighted with the progress made and look forward to 2018 when we will be working hard to ensure that every school child in America has the knowledge they need to protect themselves and other.

Watch a short video of our education lesson plans in action!

 

 

Sepsis or Flu? How to Tell the Difference

Sepsis or Flu

It’s a parent’s nightmare – your child is very sick but even if you’ve been to see the doctor or been to the hospital with them, they don’t seem to be getting better, and now that you know about sepsis you wonder if it is the flu or if it is sepsis…

Sepsis or Flu? How to Tell the Difference

In its early stages, sepsis can look a lot like a common flu – tiredness, achy muscles, fever, generally feeling really weak; these symptoms are shared by both conditions in the early stages of flu and sepsis.

But as sepsis develops, there are increasingly clear signs that something else is happening in the body: Shortness of breath, feeling like your heart is racing, cold hands and feet, extreme shivering, passing no urine, slurred speech. Your loved one’s skin might become mottled with blue marks and very pale, your child has never felt so bad. All of these or even a combination of these signs are clear indications of sepsis and mean that you should seek medical attention urgently. Tell your nurse or doctor that you are concerned about sepsis. Do not delay, as every hour is critical to survival and antibiotics and fluids must be administered immediately.

Remember, too… you can help prevent sepsis by ensuring that you and your loved ones are up to date on your vaccines – including the annual flu vaccine and as always stop the spread of infection by washing your hands!